New York City Women of Vision


Welcome to the New York City Women of Vision. We're glad you stopped by. We are a group of like-minded women who seek to serve the poor, locally and globally. Come join us as we educate, serve, and advocate for the poor.

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Summer Book Club Continues on Wednesday, July 30

“We liked to be known as the clever girls. When we decorated our hands with henna for holidays and weddings, we drew calculus and chemical formulae instead of flowers and butterflies.” – Malala Yousafzai
Join us as we discuss Malala’s childhood, her early influences and school experiences against the backdrop of the growing presence of the Taliban in Swat Valley, Pakistan.  Please read through parts I and II of the book (chapters 1-15). Click here to preview and purchase the book on Amazon.com.

When: Wednesday, July 30, 7 p.m.
Where: Trinity Baptist Church, 250 East 61st Street, Classroom B/C
Look forward to seeing you there!
Excerpt from I Am Malala:
Malala Yousafzai in classroom3.jpg
The school was not far from my home and I used to walk, but since the start of the last year I had been going with other girls by bus…. I had started taking the bus because my mother was scared of me walking on my own. We had been getting threats all year. Somewhere in the newspapers, and some were notes or messages passed on by people…. I was more concerned the Taliban would target my father, as he was always speaking out against them. His close friend and fellow campaigner Zahid Khan had been shot in the face in August on his way to prayers and I knew everyone was telling my father, “Take care, you’ll be next.”
Our street could not be reached by car, so coming home I would get off the bus on the road below by the stream and go through an iron gate and up a flight of steps…. I’d imagine that a terrorist might jump out and shoot me on those steps. I wondered what I would do.  Maybe I’d take off my shoes and hit him. But then I’d think that if I did that, there would be no difference between me and a terrorist. It would be better to plead, “OK, shoot me, but first listen to me. What you are doing is wrong. I’m not against you personally. I just want every girl to go to school.”
I wasn’t scared, but I had started making sure the gate was locked at night and asking God what happens when you die. I told my best friend, Moniba, everything…. Moniba always knew if something was wrong. “Don’t worry,” I told her. “The Taliban have never come for a small girl.”

***

Go deeper into Malala’s story by watching her father Ziauddin Yousafzai’s inspiring TED talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4mmeN8gv9o

Friday, June 27, 2014

Summer Book Club Series Begins on Monday, June 30

Join us for our summer book club series, which starts on Monday, June 30 at 7 PM. This summer we will read the courageous story of Malala Yousafzai, a champion for girls’ education worldwide, in I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban. If you have a copy of the book, please bring it with you to the first meeting.

When: Monday, June 30, 7PM

Where: Trinity Baptist Church, 250 East 61st Street (between 2nd & 3rd Ave), Classroom A 

RSVP to nycwov@gmail.com. Look forward to seeing you there!

Malala Yousafzai_Glamour Women of the Year Awards.jpg

About I Am Malala:
When the Taliban took control of the Swat Valley in Pakistan, one girl spoke out.  Malala Yousafzai refused to be silenced and fought for her right to an education.
On Tuesday, October 9, 2012, when she was fifteen, she almost paid the ultimate price.  She was shot in the head at point-blank range while riding the bus home from school, and few expected her to survive.
Instead, Malala’s miraculous recovery has taken her on an extraordinary journey from a remote valley in northern Pakistan to the halls of the United Nations in New York. At sixteen, she has become a global symbol of peaceful protest and the youngest nominee ever for the Nobel Peace Prize.
I Am Malala is the remarkable tale of a family uprooted by global terrorism, of the fight for girls’ education, of a father who, himself a school owner, championed and encouraged his daughter to write and attend school, and of brave parents who have a fierce love for their daughter in a society that prizes sons.
I Am Malala will make you believe in the power of one person’s voice to inspire change in the world.
Click here to preview and purchase the book on Amazon.com!



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Tuesday, May 20, 2014

Learn how you can change a child's life for good on June 10th


Sponsoring a child is the most powerful way you can fight poverty

Learn what just a $1 a day can do for a child, their family and community at our Child Sponsorship Event on Tuesday, June 10, from 7:30-9:30 pm. 

Child sponsorship folders will be available, as well as the ability to sponsor a child from a specific country, gender and age.

Hostesses: Christina Cename, Catherine Lee & Rhodora Soh

Where: Private Residence, RSVP to nycwov@gmail.com

Wine, fruit and cheese to be served.

NYC jewelry designer Bonnie Jennifer will have her jewelry on display that evening. 20% of her sales that evening will go towards WOV NYC. Visit her website at bonniejennifer.com.
Space is extremely limited, so RSVP as soon as possible!

Thursday, May 15, 2014

Shopping for Good: Uplifting Moms on Mother’s Day

Fifty ladies and a few great men met on April 24th for our pre-mother’s day celebration/boutique shopping event in New York City. Colorful tapestries, bags, ornaments and other goods were on display among a background of city lights and sunset on the East river. While our guests shopped, conversed, and enjoyed a glass of wine, they were serenaded by the voices of a pair of soulful singers. 



While this may sound like a common event in New York City, the purpose was quite special; everyone who came that night contributed to various causes that benefit women. Every bag, necklace, and bead elephant on sale was either created by or for a woman in a developing nation, through the help of organizations like 31Bits, Nomi Network, Heavenly Treasures, Chamuchic, Chikumbuso, Fair Trade Winds, Same Sky, and Hot Sauce 4 Good. These organizations train women to produce these products, run businesses, and uplift their families. In all, our guests contributed approximately $4,000 to these causes, bringing home gifts that will make mom smile while extending that same joy to other moms around the world.



In addition to their generosity with the various vendors, guests also contributed to World Vision’s Women’s Entrepreneurial and Gender Equality Project in Bolivia. This project provides entrepreneurship training for women, as well as biblically-based education for men on supporting women at home and in business. At The Bolivia Project table, guests could sponsor various objects women use for their craft, ranging from wool for $25 to a sewing machine for $1,000. We are very happy to report that we exceeded our fundraising goal for the night, raising $5,000 specifically for this project. We extend our deepest thanks to our guests for their generous support of these causes. 



I encourage everyone reading who is interested in these issues to check out the vendors and Bolivia Project pages, where you can learn specific information about each cause and contribute directly. If you are a woman with a vision of a better world for all, please sign up for our newsletter or follow us on Facebook. We are always on the lookout for women with talents and heart, and would love to have you at our upcoming events.

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Event Recap: Manufacturing Her Success

In March, we hosted a phenomenal Speaker Event with Diana Mao, Co-Founder and President of the Nomi Network, a non-profit that empowers women who have been victims of the sex trafficking industry by providing them with vocational training. The women they work with produce and sell beautiful handmade bags, which were on sale at the event. Diana gave a fascinating overview of her organization's model for combating sex trafficking.

Sex trafficking is a $99 billion industry affecting 32 million people worldwide. Visit the NomiNetwork to learn how you can help. Or view our post about how you can directly take action! 




Take Action: Manufacturing Her Success

Thank you for joining NYC Women of Vision on March 13 for Manufacturing Her Success featuring Diana Mao of Nomi Network and hosted by the Trinity Lecture Series. Below are two ways you can respond to the issues we discussed and take action to fight human trafficking and empower women around the world:
1) Advocate: Tell Congress to protect legislation to fight human trafficking:


2) Donate:  With a microloan as little as $25, you can support a female entrepreneur in places like Cambodia, where many women and girls are at risk for human trafficking. Help a woman start her business to lift herself and her family out of poverty.  Join our group on World Vision Micro and start lending today! http://www.worldvisionmicro.org/groups/164_wov_new_york_city_ny_chapter




Meet Mary
Mary is 34 years old and runs a small business selling groceries. She lives in World Vision's Leuk Daek region in Cambodia. Mary has sold groceries in this area for 4 years.

Mary has requested a loan from World Vision to expand her business. With the loan, she would like to expand her grocery store. Mary and her husband have 4 children, of whom 3 are currently studying in school.

Help fund Mary's loan




If you would like to volunteer for our future educational events, please email nycwov@gmail.com.

Event Recap: Bowery Mission Service Trip

On March 29th, the ladies of Women of Vision, NYC took a trip to The Women’s Bowery Mission at Heartsease Home, a faith-based residential recovery program for homeless women in Manhattan. The Bowery Mission Women’s Center provides a home and community where women can participate in counseling, life skills classes, tutoring and resume assistance with the aim of re-entering society as whole, productive individuals. 



The ladies of WOV prepared a dinner of beef lasagna, vegetable lasagna and brownies for the residents and staff of The Bowery Mission, then sat down to share stories and make connections with the women.  Friendships were formed, with some women returning for follow-up visits in the following days.

While our work often touches women at the far reaches of the world, we greatly enjoyed the opportunity to serve in this city we call home.